Hiking and Playing, Coyote Hills, Fremont

If you read my post yesterday, you know we attended the Nectar Garden Fun Day at Coyote Hills Regional Park on Monday.  I invited friends from my Nature Time! playgroup to attend with us, and the kids had a great time running around and playing after they were done with the butterfly activities.  A favorite for kid-play is the large grass field in front of the Visitor Center.  But my son has also loved exploring the nectar garden since we began coming here four years ago, when he was one. It’s even more fun with a friend.

Now that he’s older (just five), I feel more comfortable walking with him on the boardwalk through the marsh (no rails!).  The boardwalk over and through the marsh is magical for children, with the tall grasses and water birds.  If you have a really young child, the trails through and around the marsh are easy to do with a stroller.

If you’d like to read about and check out the photos from the first part of our visit (to the Nectar Garden Fun Day and our exploration of the Nectar Garden), you’ll find it here… “Nectar Garden Fun, Coyote Hills

For more information about Coyote Hills (location, trail map, entry fee, etc.)… www.ebparks.org/parks/coyote_hills

10 thoughts on “Hiking and Playing, Coyote Hills, Fremont

  1. Pingback: Monarchs! Butterfly & Bird Festival, Coyote Hills, Fremont « A Nature Mom

  2. I used to take my children to the boardwalk across the Chattahoochee River at the nature center near my house–so this post brought back fond memories. It looks like your children had a delightful time! How wonderful. 🙂

    • Taxes! We’ve voted to pay extra taxes in our county to protect the wild areas. Additional fees come from donations and membership and entry fees. I’ve read that the East Bay Regional Park District is the largest of its kind in the U.S.

        • California, however, is in bad shape. Funding for our state parks is being slashed, and many will soon be closed to the public. In hard economic times, the government must cut somewhere. In some cases, citizen and non-profit groups are taking control of the parks slated for closure.

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